Grumpier Old Men (1995)

Director: Howard Deutch

Starring: Jack Lemmon, Walter Mathau, Sophia Loren, Ann-Margaret, Daryl Hannah, Kevin Pollack, Ann Guilbert, and Burgess Meredith

“I find you disgusting.”  “Well, just as long as you find me.”

Six months after the events of Grumpy Old Men, Melanie (Hannah) and Jacob (Pollack) are engaged, Max (Mathau) and John (Lemmon) are getting along as they help their children plan their wedding, John and Ariel (Margaret) are happily married, and Maria Ragetti (Loren) moves to Wabasha to turn Chuck’s Bait Shop into Ragetti’s, a romantic lakefront Italian ristorante.  Max and John do everything in their power to sabotage Ragetti’s, but Maria catches Max’s attention.

Though I usually get tired of movies that just repeat the same gags and rely on the same humor to the point where it gets annoyingly repetitive, Grumpier Old Men is the exception.  This film relies heavily on a lot of what made Grumpy Old Men great, but they advance the main and secondary stories in a way that keeps things fresh, and introducing a love interest for Max.  Using the same pleasantries Max and John exchange with each other makes sense since they’ve been friends/enemies virtually their whole lives.  Why change it at this point?

I enjoyed seeing some of the central themes get fleshed out in this movie.  Characters deal with getting older, finding and staying in love, and dealing with assorted family dynamics.  It’s interesting how much the younger generation is trying to help out their parent and the how the parent responds.  Jacob tries to get Max to do more than just “wait for another Ariel to drop into your life.” John tries to get Grandpa Gustafson to drink light beer or low-fat bacon.

Loren gives a great performance as Maria integrating into an already established cast.  She does a good job as a woman who wants to open a nice restaurant but also has a lot of relational baggage.  She is a formidable foe to Max and John and holds her own with Matthau as their relationship develops.  Having Mama Ragetti (Guilbert) in Grumpier Old Men gives Grandpa Gustafson a love interest and makes it easier to bring him to a more prominent supporting role in the film.

Though he was less prominent in the first film, Burgess Meredith delivers a lot of great lines in Grumpier Old Men.  He was better utilized in this film, whereas he spent most of his time in an ice shanty in Grumpy Old Men.  I especially like his scenes with Lemmon.  They do the father-son dynamic very well, and I especially love how John goes to his dad for advice even though he himself is retired.  The scene where John is going through the laundry list of what’s going on and is seeking out his dad’s advice, that scene always gets me.

It’s also interesting how similar background music is used with specific events in both films.  There are a lot of ways to do this wrong where it seems more repetitive and lazy, but it works in this movie.

As with its predecessor, Grumpier Old Men relies heavily on the comedic chemistry between the two lead actors, but also utilizes every performance to create a well-rounded, fun, heart-warming, and at times irreverent movie.

I enjoy it, I’ll see it again, I’d recommend it.

My Rating: 4 out of 5 stars.

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Grumpy Old Men (1993)

Director: Donald Petrie

Starring: Jack Lemmon, Walter Mathau, Ann-Margaret, Daryl Hannah, Kevin Pollack, Ossie Davis, and Burgess Meredith

” I also know the only thing in life that you regret are the risks that you don’t take.”

Retired history teacher John Gustafson (Lemmon) and retired TV repairman Max Goldman (Matthau) have been sworn enemies, and next door neighbors, their entire lives.  Their rivalry only intensifies when Ariel Traux (Margaret), a college professor from California, moves in across the street in their small town of Wabasha, Minnesota.

I’ve seen this movie many times, mostly around the time it came out.  I was probably too young for Grumpy Old Men when came out, but since my parents and grandparents loved the movie, that made it ok for me to watch.  Although Lemmon and Matthau had done many movies together, this was my first exposure to either actor.  As I’ve gone back through and seen a few more of each individually and acting together, I’ve been able to see the great talent each actor has and the great chemistry they have with one another.  Gustafson and Goldman could easily be swapped for Felix Unger and Oscar Madison from The Odd Couple, Goldman is more working class and more of a slob whereas Gustafson is more straight-laced.

Though I may see this film through rose-colored glasses with fond memories from my childhood, revisiting Grumpy Old Men and its sequel Grumpier Old Men, has helped me have a better appreciation for each movie.  It may be because I have a different appreciation for the complexities in each characters lives.  I think I’ve been able to see this for more than just the comedic aspects.  There is also tragedy and conflict in each character.

This movie has a tremendous supporting cast.  Ossie Davis does great as the guy who cuts through the crap with John and Max.  He calls it like it is and makes the most of his scenes.  Daryl Hannah and Kevin Pollack are great as John’s daughter Melanie and Max’s son Jacob.  Each does great with their own subplots (Melanie is in a bad marriage and Jacob is running for Mayor of Wabasha) and they do a great job putting these subplots within the main story.  Burgess Meredith has very limited screen time in Grumpy Old Men, but he makes his presence known, and delivers some great one liners.  I like that he is more prominent in Grumpier Old Men, and will reserve some of my thoughts on his performances for a review of that film.

Lemmon and Matthau showcase their chemistry in this movie.  Each character is widowed and dealing with his own problems.  It seemed only natural for their rivalry to rev up with Ariel entering their lives.  Though the characters are considering themselves lifelong enemies, at the core they do care about each other.  When Max realizes John is in trouble with the IRS, he does everything he can to help his neighbor.  The scene where John tells Max that Chuck died is very powerful.  John is taking his frustration out chopping wood, and upon sharing the news with Max, Max responds with anger.  The moment Max goes in and sees his hat from Chuck’s bait shop, the news finally hits him.

Ann-Margaret does a fine job as the worldly and at times eccentric Ariel.  She’s not overpowering, but definitely holds her own with the serious and comedic scenes in this movie.  I haven’t seen very many Ann-Margaret films, but she complements Lemmon and Matthau in her scenes with each actor.

There are a few moments in Grumpy Old Men that I don’t distinctly remember from watching this movie years ago that I just enjoyed now.  When John and Max are fighting on the frozen lake, Grandpa Gustafson (Meredith) yells at the guys and they immediately stop and Max refers to him as Mr. Gustafson.  It’s humorous and interesting to me to see a man in his last 60s refer to someone older than him in a way that conveys respect and reverence.  It’s also interesting to see Jacob have a lot of the same mannerisms and use the same phrases as Max.  I realize he’s his son, but Petrie makes a point to have Jacob say lines like “Holy moly” and humming the same tune as his father did at the end of the movie.

This is an enjoyable movie to revisit.  I liked seeing more of the family relationship aspects in these characters, something I paid less attention to when I was younger.  That adds depth and enriches this movie.  I will definitely watch Grumpy Old Men again, though it will probably be a while before I do so.

My Rating: 4 out of 5 stars.

Movie #119: Jurassic Park (1993)

Director: Steven Spielberg

Starring: Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, Richard Attenborough, Wayne Knight, Samuel L. Jackson, BD Wong

Academy Awards (1994):

Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing: Gary Rydstrom, Richard Hymns

Best Effects, Visual Effects: Dennis Muren, Stan Winston, Phil Tippett, Michael Lantieri

Best Sound: Gary Summers, Gary Rydstrom, Shawn Murphy, Ron Judkins

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“God help us, we’re in the hands of engineers.”

Eccentric billionaire John Hammond (Attenborough) has built a park with genetically recreated dinosaurs on a remote island.  Prior to opening Jurassic Park, he invites palaeontologists Allen Grant (Neill) and Ellie Sattler (Dern), chaos theorist Ian Malcolm (Goldblum), and his grandchildren for a sneak preview that doesn’t go as smoothly as planned.

I was too young to see Jurassic Park when it first came out, and it’s one of those movies that I’ve only recently seen.  Also, I watched this on VHS, so while I’m sure the picture quality and some of the special effects have been tweaked over the years, I am for all intents and purposes unaware of them.

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Jurassic Park was enjoyable to watch.  It had engaging characters with witty dialogue.  Top to bottom the cast worked well together.  Though Goldblum has many of the memorable lines, it was interesting to see how each character interacted with everyone else.  Hammond realizing the dangers of what he had done and Grant’s interactions with Lex and Tim Murphy were two of the more notable examples of character growth.

It was interesting, and annoying, to see how quickly Donald Gennaro (Martin Ferrero) switched from being the skeptical attorney to overzealous cheerleader when he realized how much money the park could potentially make.  Hammond’s enthusiasm for the park was infectious for most of the people who worked there.  There was almost a “nothing could possibly go wrong” feel at the island.  It was nice to see Gennaro get what he deserved.

There was also enough suspense to keep things interesting.  The first introduction of the T-Rex and the velociraptors chasing Lex and Tim had just the right amount of build-up to keep me on the edge of my seat.  Though I knew in the back of my head that most of the main characters would be safe, there was still just enough doubt to keep things engaging.

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Despite the great performances in Jurassic Park, the real stars of the film were the dinosaurs.   One of the biggest accomplishments of this movie is the special effects.  Although it’s primitive by current standards, in 1993, it was cutting edge.  The dinosaurs were impressive, even in a VHS format.  It’s not very surprising, though, given the fact that it’s a film by Steven Spielberg.

Though some elements of Jurassic Park have clearly become dated, it is still an enjoyable, suspenseful film.  It’s a franchise that I will probably someday get around to watching, but it’s definitely one worth watching.

My Rating: 4 out of 5 stars.

Best Picture Winners. Movie #117: Braveheart (1995)

Director: Mel Gibson

Starring: Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau, Brian Cox, Patrick McGoohan, Catherine McCormack, David O’Hara, Brendan Gleeson and Agnus MacFadyen

Academy Awards (1996):

Best Cinematography: John Toll

Best Director: Mel Gibson

Best Makeup: Peter Frampton, Paul Pattison, Lois Burwell

Best Picture: Mel Gibson, Alan Ladd Jr., and Bruce Davey

Best Sound Effects Editing: Lon Bender, Per Hallberg

Academy Award Nominations:

Best Costume Design: Charles Knode

Best Film Editing: Steven Rosenblum

Best Music, Original Dramatic Score: James Horner

Best Sound: Andy Nelson, Scott Millan, Anna Behlmer, Brian Simmons

Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen: Randall Wallace

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“It’s all for nothing if you don’t have freedom.”

In 1280,  King Edward “Longshanks” (Patrick McGoohan) of England claims the vacant Scottish throne for himself following the death of the Scottish king.  He kills a lot of the Scottish nobility, luring them under the guise of peace.  In the ensuing battles, Malcolm Wallace, a commoner, and his oldest son John are also killed.  William Wallace (Gibson), Malcolm’s other son, goes away to Italy with his Uncle Argyle Wallace (Brian Cox).  Returning 20 years later, he meets back up with childhood friend Hamish (Brendan Gleeson) and Murron MacClannough (Catherine McCormack), a girl he has always been in love with.

Longshanks had issued a decree of “Prima Nocte” where English noblemen with land rights in Scotland can have sex with a new bride on her wedding night.  Wallace and Murron marry in secret to avoid this.  Some time later, Murron attacks an English soldier who tries to rape her, leading the local magistrate to tie her up and slit her throat.

Wrong move dude.

An enraged Wallace kills the local garrison, magistrate included, and declares that the Scottish people will no longer be ruled by the English.  His growing army takes the fight to the English, while Robert the Bruce (Angus MacFayden) acts as a go between for Wallace with the feuding Scottish nobles.

Historical inaccuracies aside, this is a pretty entertaining movie that offers a little bit for everyone.  It is primarily an epic, but it mixes in drama, action, comedy and romance and kept me engaged throughout the 177 minutes of running time.  I’ve seen this film plenty of times, and though it’s one I can quote extensively, I tried to come into it with a clean slate.

The countryside shots are magnificent, and James Horner write a dazzling soundtrack that complements the film’s cinematography.  The battle sequences were impressive given the scope and scale involved with each one.  Though mildly gory by my standards, this one had just enough blood and guts to be believable.  The only thing about the battle sequences for me was how long they lasted.  I feel like they could have been shortened up a bit while still getting the same message and point across.

Given the scope and massive undertaking Braveheart was, it’s not all that surprising that the next time Gibson directed a movie was nine years later with Passion of the Christ.

"What will you do with that freedom?"

“What will you do with that freedom?”

In addition to an impressive directing job, Mel Gibson’s acting was well done.  He balances the conflict with the Scottish nobles, the English, and his own internal driving force following the murder of his beloved Murron.  His character is macho, but also intelligent, sensible, and at times humorous.  It’s hard for me to criticize his performance.  I think the fact that he directed the film helped enhance his performance on-screen.

" I have nothing. Men fight for me because if they do not, I throw them off my land and I starve their wives and children. Those men who bled the ground red at Falkirk fought for William Wallace. He fights for something that I never had."

“He fights for something that I never had.”

"The trouble with Scotland is that it's full of Scots."

“The trouble with Scotland is that it’s full of Scots.”

Both Angus MacFayden and Patrick McGoohan did great jobs as Robert the Bruce and King Edward I.  McGoohan’s villain is relentless, conniving, and to the point.  It was interesting to see how his character changed as time went by health-wise.  He’s a guy you just want to hate.

Bruce’s character is almost more interesting as a character study than anyone else in Braveheart.  The internal struggle as he battles between what’s expected of him as a Scottish nobleman contrasted with what he believes is right is something I’ve always found intriguing.  Some of the best scenes of the film, in my opinion, take place with him talking with his father.

Stephen (David O’Hara) and Hamish are great supporting characters.  Though Stephen is mostly there for comic relief, he has a few moments of genuine and honest concern with some of the decisions William made.  It was also interesting in seeing Hamish as he fought alongside his dad, Campbell (James Cosmo), and how their relationship grew through the film.

"Why do you help me?" "Because of the way you are looking at me now."

“Why do you help me?”
“Because of the way you are looking at me now.”

One thing that sets this movie apart from your run-of-the-mill epic is the underlying romantic influence on Wallace and his relationship with Murron and Princess Isabelle (Sophie Marceau).  William is the most vulnerable and realistic when he’s with each woman.  Though the romantic development at times seemed cliché, here it worked well and integrated into the story.

When one thinks of Braveheart: “They may take our lives, but they’ll never take OUR FREEDOM!” and “Every man dies, not every man really lives.” comes to mind.  It’s more than just the battles and bloodshed.  A king trying to hold on to power, a noble son struggling with what’s most important, and a reluctant warrior carrying the burdens of a nation while coping with the loss of virtually everyone close to him all flow together to create an entertaining film worthy of the Best Picture Academy Award.

My Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars.

Best Picture Winners: Movie #114: Schindler’s List (1993)

From now until Oscar Sunday I will be reviewing Best Picture winners. Enjoy!

Director: Steven Spielberg

Starring: Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes, Ben Kingsley, Caroline Goodall, Jonathan Sagalle

Academy Awards (1994):

Best Picture: Steven Spielberg, Gerald R. Molen, Branko Lustig

Best Director: Steven Spielberg

Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium: Steven Zaillian

Best Cinematography: Janusz Kaminski

Best Film Editing: Michael Kahn

Best Art Direction-Set Decoration: Allan Starski, Ewa Braun

Best Music, Original Score: John Williams

Academy Award Nominations:

Best Actor in a Leading Role: Liam Neeson

Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Ralph Fiennes

Best Costume Design: Anna Sheppard

Best Makeup: Matthew W. Mungle, Christina Smith, Judith A. Cory

Best Sound: Andy Nelson, Ron Judkins, Scott Millan, Steve Pederson

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As World War II begins, the Nazis move Polish Jews into the Kraków Ghetto.  Businessman Oskar Schindler (Neeson), a member of the Nazi Party, arrives in Krakow to make a fortune.  Bribing local German officials and making connections with the local Jewish black marketeers through Itzhak Stern (Kingsley), Schindler opens a factory producing enamel ware.  He hires numerous Jewish workers, who cost less than Polish workers, and saves those workers from being sent to concentration and extermination camps.

SS officer Amon Goeth (Fiennes) arrives in Kraków to oversee the construction of the Płaszów concentration camp.  Once the camp is completed, he orders the ghetto be liquidated, killing many of the Jews in the process.  Schindler witnesses this from a distance, and shifts his priorities from making money to saving as many lives as possible.

This is Spielberg’s masterpiece.

There are very few films I’ve watched where I just have to sit and really let it soak in once the end credits roll.  Movies like this really put into perspective how pathetic and petty my “struggles” really are.  That’s been the case both times I’ve watched Schindler’s List.

Someone who makes a film about something as significant as the Holocaust has to be all in: directing, motivating performers, production, set design, etc.  Though the full scope of the Holocaust can’t be completely explored in one movie, Steven Spielberg has probably come the closest to accomplishing this.  Filming most of the movie in Poland instead of at a studio, using actors who work best in performing the complex emotions and actions of their characters are a couple of the things Spielberg nails spot on with Schindler’s List.

Stanley Kubrick was in production of his own Holocaust film, Aryan Papers, about the same time that Schindler’s List was released.  He abandoned it, though, in part because of the broad scope of the subject matter.  His critique centered on the fact that Schindler’s focuses on those who survived, a much smaller group compared to the more than 6 million who didn’t.

The black-and-white enhances the gravity of the subject matter.  The way Schindler’s List is filmed conveys the human element that a documentary can’t quite capture while still having that documentary-type feel.

schindlerslist1Liam Neeson gives one of the best performances of his career.  He handles the various emotional stages Schindler goes through authentically.  It’s interesting to see his transformation from a boozing, gambling, womanizing man living the highlife to a man hellbent on saving as many lives as he can.  Witnessing the ghetto liquidation and Goeth’s heartless treatment of the Jews forces Schindler to stop keeping everyone at arm’s length and really take stock in his main purpose.  Though he had done quite a few movies prior to Schindler’s List, he hadn’t had that one great breakout role.  As a result, his star power doesn’t overshadow his performance as could have happened had a more accomplished actor been chosen for this role.

Having already won an Oscar for his role in Gandhi, Ben Kingsley is a grounded, purposeful character with wisdom, insight, and perspective.  His nonverbal expressions provide a continuous reflection of Schindler’s character and his gradual transformation.  Stern acts as Schindler’s conscience to a certain extent.  He also offers perspective that Schindler has saved many lives when Schindler felt guilty for not sacrificing more to save more.

schindlerslistfiennesRalph Fiennes gives an Oscar-worthy performance as the heartless and cruel Amon Goeth.  His intimidation tactics with the Jewish prisoners works well in keeping them in line out of absolute fear.  He seems like the kind of person who keeps pushing to see just how much he can get away with.  It’s good, though, that he can be bribed and Schindler can help set some boundaries with his random and senseless killings.

"Whoever saves one life saves the world entire."

“Whoever saves one life saves the world entire.”

The final scene where the real life Schindler Jews placing stones on Schindler’s grave was especially moving.  I can appreciate someone like Spielberg wanting to tell their story and show the lasting impact that Oskar Schindler had on those that he saved.  The epilogue serves as a time capsule that reaffirms that tangible human connection to those who lived and survived something as horrific as the Holocaust.

Having seen Schindler’s List twice now, I highly doubt I could sit through it again aside from watching it with someone else.  It’s one of those films that is so powerful and moving that it only needs to be watched once.  It is most definitely deserving of the 7 Academy Awards it earned in 1994, and remains timeless as it explored one of history’s darkest events.

My Rating: 5 out of 5 stars. 

Movie #111: Se7en (1995)

Director: David Fincher

Starring: Morgan Freeman, Brad Pitt, Kevin Spacey, Gwyneth Paltrow, R. Lee Emery, John C. McGinley

Academy Award Nominations (1996):

Best Film Editing: Richard Francis-Bruce

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Ernest Hemingway once wrote, “The world is a fine place and worth fighting for.” I agree with the second part.

Veteran Detective Lieutenant William Somerset (Freeman) and newly transferred Detective David Mills (Pitt) investigate a series of homicides by John Doe (Spacey).  The pattern of murders is unique in that they are each based on one of the seven deadly sins: gluttony, greed, sloth, lust, pride, envy, and wrath.

This movie is a bit of a mixed bag for me.  I’m not really into the gruesomeness that can come with this type of movie.  David Fincher has done a good job of using just enough of the stomach-churning elements within the story.  With each new murder scene, he slowly builds the tension, each scene upping the ante.  Given the subject matter, it’s also good how he keeps the lighting relatively dark and depressing.

se7ensleeping This is also a great example of casting the right, if not perfect, actors for the central characters.  Morgan Freeman is great as that older calming voice of reason.  I have a tremendous amount of respect for Freeman as an actor.  I can’t see anyone else being able to pull this off, and yet Freeman seems to be able to nail this type of character every time.

He is balanced out by Mills, the headstrong go-getter.  Pitt does great in this role, balancing the new job with his home life.  It’s not surprising that Pitt and Fincher have collaborated a few times since Se7en.  Mills and Somerset complement each other in a way that brings a balanced approach to finding the killer.

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Though Freeman and Pitt do well with their characters, Kevin Spacey really steals the show for me.  Though he doesn’t appear until much later in the film, he controls every scene in such a way that only he could do.  Spacey has the look and feeling of that creepy, mysterious guy.  He gives you a false sense of security and then he pulls off his ulterior motive.

It’s also interesting to see all of these people and how much different they are now twenty years later.

Though it’s not the type of film I’ll go out of my way to see, Se7en is engaging and entertaining.  It balances out three great actors, each able to place their own creative stamp within their relatively simple, straightforward parts.  It’s been long enough since I watched this one that some parts of it surprised me, however, I don’t think this is one I’ll revisit anytime soon.

My Rating: 4/5 stars

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III (1993)

In anticipation for the new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie set to release August 7, 2014, I am reviewing the four previous Ninja Turtles movies.  I’m incredibly skeptical about this new film, and will probably write some previewing commentary based on what I know of the new film.

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“Would somebody please tell me what the heck is going on around here?

“Well, relax, April. It’s just your, uh, ordinary time travel equal-mass-displacement kind of thing.”

With Shredder and The Foot defeated, New York City is safe once again thanks to the turtles.  Leonardo, Michaelangelo, Donatello, and Raphael spend their time practicing their ninja skills, but Raph grows weary of it since they have no enemy to fight.  April O’Neil (Paige Turco), who is about to leave for vacation, has picked up some antiques for the guys to keep them entertained.  One of the items is an ancient Japanese scepter she’s gotten for Splinter.  It has the ability to switch people of the same weight in time.  The scepter is activated, whisking away April to feudal Japan, and replacing her with Kenshin (Henry Hayashi), a prince from that time.

Naturally, the turtles go back and face new villains: Walker (Stuart Wilson), an opportunistic Brit who does business with Lord Norinaga (Sab Shimono), Kenshin’s father.  Aiding the rebels, among them Kenshin’s mate Mitsu (Vivian Wu), the turtles try to end the civil war and bring April back to the present day.

Growing up I always thought this movie was entertaining and fun.  As time has gone on, though, the reality that this film does a lot of things wrong, ultimately being the last turtles film from New Line Cinema, have become very apparent.

Having killed Shredder at the end of Secret of the Ooze, the turtles have no real enemy to worry about.  The city is safe, and they’re left twiddling their thumbs and continually practicing their skills.

tmnt3walkerThe replacement villains just don’t match up with Shredder and the Foot Clan.  Though I don’t know what else they could have done with Shredder had he lived, I would imagine it would’ve been better than Walker, his bumbling sidekick Niles, and Lord Norinaga.

This was the first turtles movie that didn’t use Jim Henson’s Creature Shop for the animatronics, and it definitely shows.  The mouth movement with the turtles’ dialog wasn’t great in the first two films, but here it’s so far off it’s just plain sad.  Most of the time it’s not even close.

tmnt3caseyThis film brought back Casey Jones.  Though I prefer his character over Keno from Secret of the Ooze, here he’s used in a more comical surface-level character in Turtles III.  One of the things I enjoyed most about him in the original film was the depth and interconnectedness he had with both the turtles, April, and Splinter.  It was interesting, though, how they incorporated Elias Koteas into ancient Japan as Whit.

Unfortunately Casey, along with the rest of the cast, is reduced to juvenile comic relief.  As much as I was disappointed with how they used Casey, Splinter’s surface level role was more disappointing.  Whereas he provided depth, historical context, and fatherly insight in the first two films, here he’s just another comic.  Paige Turco returned as April O’Neil.  As with many other aspects of the film franchise, I thought she gave a much better performance in Secret of the Ooze.  Her character had a bigger part in the previous films, but here she’s somewhat a voice of reason for the turtles, but primarily used in a more comedic way.

One of the only redeeming qualities in this film is the development of the turtles as they try to get back to present day New York City.  They did move Raphael’s character forward in his relationship with Yoshi, Mitsu’s son.  Seeing Yoshi’s temper and watching as Raphael moves from student to teacher was interesting and overall well done.

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As a film in general, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III was very disappointing, and it’s understandable why it was 14 years before another turtles movie, animated at that, was made.  By trading in-depth and a strong enemy like Shredder and his clan, the turtles franchise gave up some of the things that made the first two films great, and instead rely too heavily on comedy, comedy, comedy.  There was no balance of the serious sprinkled with the comedy.  It’s definitely geared towards a younger audience, but even at that it still wasn’t that great.  I’ll probably watch it again at some point, but that’s more because I’m a fan of the early franchise.

My Rating: 1 out of 5 stars.